Restore Our Normal Classes: 2G-Troubled Kashmiri Students Urge KU Admin

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 “We want the last semester to be offline because there is no reason to keep the semester online as the shopping malls, cinema halls, theatres parks are all open except for the university.”

SRINAGAR- Suffering from the slow-internet connectivity, the third and fourth semester post-graduation students at the University of Kashmir are demanding the classes to be restored offline.

These students haven’t fully joined the campus after the abrogation of Article-370 last summer — when everything came to a grinding halt in Kashmir.

“We want the last semester to be offline because there is no reason to keep the semester online as the shopping malls, cinema halls, theatres parks are all open except for the university,” Zainab, the students representative from the post-graduate department, told Kashmir Observer.

According to her, most of the students are boycotting the online classes and exams.

“Already, the 2018 and 2019 batches have been facing a lot of problems since the lockdown because some students had to stay in PGs just to gain access to 2G internet,” said a student from Baramulla.

Besides, she added, absence of UGC guidelines on how to conduct the online classes is creating confusion among students.

To press for their demand, the student body has already written a letter to Lieutenant Governor, but so far, Zainab said, Raj Bhavan hasn’t responded to their “righteous demand”.

Meanwhile, Prof. Nissar Ahmad, the Registrar at the University of Kashmir, told Kashmir Observer that the varsity is already in a structure to take the last semester offline but there is slight flexibility.

“Though the administration has not taken any decision yet, the flexibility was provided after the law students protested for the exams to be held online,” Registrar told Kashmir Observer.

According to him, the University of Kashmir will take a call on the offline classes in a month based on the government guidelines.

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