Harassment Of Diplomats: India, Pak Agree To Bury The Hatchet

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New Delhi—India and Pakistan on Friday mutually agreed to resolve matters related to the treatment of diplomats and diplomatic premises, a press release of the Ministry of External Affairs said.

The two countries have decided to resolve the matter in line with the 1992 “Code of Conduct for the treatment of diplomatic/consular personnel in India and Pakistan”, the release added.

In a press release, the MEA stated that the decision has been taken in line with the 1992 “Code of Conduct for the treatment of diplomatic/consular personnel in India and Pakistan”. India had sent several Note Verbales to Pakistan over the harassment and intimidation of its employees at the Indian High Commission in Islamabad, pointing out that such incidents were in violation of the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations of 1961 and a threat to the security and safety of the personnel of the High Commission of India.

“India and Pakistan have mutually agreed to resolve matters related to the treatment of diplomats and diplomatic premises, in line with the 1992 ‘Code of Conduct for the treatment of diplomatic/consular personnel in India and Pakistan’,” the MEA said in the release on Friday. India sends 16th Note Verbale to Pakistan, mentions three instances of ‘harassment’ of diplomats

Pakistan this month, in a bid to embarrass New Delhi has gone public with its complaints of alleged harassment of its diplomatic staff and their family in the national capital. On 15 March, the Pakistan’s foreign ministry announced that it was calling back High Commissioner Sohail Mahmood for consultations in light of some recent incidents.

Islamabad’s decision to send High Commissioner Sohail Mahmood back to India just in time to host the Pakistan National Day reception in New Delhi, and New Delhi’s decision to send the Minister of State for Agriculture and Farmers’ Welfare, Gajendra Singh Shekhawat, to attend the reception indicate that good sense may have prevailed on both sides. More pertinently, since the 19th of this month, India and Pakistan have not fired at each other across the border in Jammu and Kashmir barring one exception, a welcome calm after several weeks of incessant ceasefire violations.

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