Iran to establish ‘Islamic Nobel Prize’ for scientists

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Iranian Vice President for Science and Technology Nasrin Soltankhah said the Iranian government plans to grant a Nobel-like prize to selected Muslim scientists in a bid to encourage them to promote and elevate their works and prepare them for “tighter and harder rivalries at global levels, like the Nobel Prize,” Fars news agency reports.

Iran announced on Saturday that it plans to award Nobel-like science and technology prizes to selected Muslim scientists, Iran’s Fars news agency reported.

Iranian Vice President for Science and Technology Nasrin Soltankhah said the Iranian government plans to grant a Nobel-like prize to selected Muslim scientists in a bid to encourage Muslim world scholars to promote and elevate their works and prepare them for “tighter and harder rivalries at global levels, like the Nobel Prize,” Fars reported.

Iran has only one Nobel Prize winner, Shirin Ebadi, awarded the prize for peace in 2003.

Among the world’s 49 Muslim-majority countries, Nobel prizes have been won by Egypt (two for peace, one for chemistry, one for literature), Pakistan (one for physics), Bangladesh (two for peace), the Palestinian Authority (one for peace), Turkey (one for literature) and Yemen (one for peace).

Soltankhah said the Iranian biennial award would be called the “Great Prophet World Prize,” and the move was meant to promote rivalry among the Muslim world’s researchers and scientists.

“The prize will be granted biennially to the Muslim world scientists in three technological fields in which Iran has also made outstanding progress,” she added.

Fars reported that “Iran has made huge achievements in various fields of science and technology, from nuclear knowledge to stem cell and medicine production as well as nanotechnology.”

Iranian Health Minister Marziyeh Vahid Dastjerdi announced in August that Iran is now able to synthesize 15 kinds of radiomedicines inside the country, stressing that the achievement resulted from efforts made by the country’s nuclear scientists.

“Due to the efforts made by the Iranian scientists and the nuclear scientists martyred (by the enemies), we have 15 radiomedicines in our country which are vital for providing diagnosis and treatment services to the patients, specially cancerous patients,” she said in a ceremony in Tehran at the time, according to Fars.

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