Fury After BBC documentary suggests UK Govt plotted 7/7 to boost Iraq war

London – Families of victims of the 7/7 London bombings have slammed British television network, BBC, for a ‘disgusting’ documentary that investigates conspiracy theories surrounding the atrocity.

The programme, ‘7/7 Bombings: Conspiracy Road Trip’, to be aired on BBC3, and hosted by Irish comedian Andrew Maxwell, claims that the co-ordinated blasts were in fact part of a government plot to boost support for the Iraq War.

The 7/7 attacks in 2005 had killed 52 people, when four suicide bombers, who were British Muslims, detonated their home made devices on the London Tubes and a bus during the morning rush-hour commute.

However, in the documentary show, producers blow up a double-decker London bus in a bid to recreate the explosion in Tavistock Square that killed 13 people.

“The BBC can’t get any lower than this. They should have spoken to the families,” the Daily Mail quoted June Taylor, as saying, whose daughter Carrie, 24, died in the underground blast near Aldgate Station

Branding the programme ‘disgusting’, she added: “They are trivialising the tragedy. People don’t want to be back in that dark place. It puts us through the pain all over again.”

However, a BBC spokeswoman said the “the series takes conspiracy theorists on a journey to fully explore the facts and challenge their beliefs.”

Though an original report, endorsed by a high-level Parliamentary inquiry and the government, insisted that the bombers carried out the attacks on their own, constructing explosives from chapatti flour and hair bleach mixed in the bath at a flat in Leeds, Yorkshire, there have since been a wave of conspiracy theories around the attacks, the paper said.

Theorists have also accused government agents of setting off pre-planted explosives under the three Tube trains and on the bus, it added.

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